Blog : Shore Haven

2017 Entry Level Lake Access Market Review

2017 Entry Level Lake Access Market Review

That’s a mouthful. I’m sure there’s a better way to say it for search engine optimization, but the market is best defined in that way.  The market isn’t particularly flashy. It won’t make any headlines. It won’t be in Crain’s or in Architectural Digest. But the entry level lake access market is the market that’s as important as any other here. These are the homes available to people who have enough fiscal power to make a vacation home a reality, but don’t have lakefront budgets.  For the purposes of this post, this segment remains at $500,000 and under.

All of these 2017 market reviews are going to tell similar stories. It’s all about inventory. About volume. And about how the inventory is either going to build and feed the market or shrivel and starve it. Today, there are just 12 homes priced under $500k with access to Geneva Lake. Remember, these are not municipal access homes- these are private, club style access points.  These are the associations you know, the associations that can offer a path to the lake, a park, a pier, a diving board, maybe some summertime geraniums in pots.

Those 12 homes vary wildly, just as this market varies. A $200k cottage in Country Club Estates is not at all like a $500k home in Country Club Estates. A small cottage in Oak Shores with a slip for $450k isn’t much dissimilar to a small cottage without a slip in Cedar Point Park, except that the Cedar Point cottage will be 50% cheaper. This is a market that I’ve gladly served for two decades, and it’s a market that hinges on a very important question: Do you want a nice house or do you want to be close to the lake?  You cannot choose both.

For the year just ended, we sold 61 lake access homes of all makes and models, priced under $500k.  The 2016 total was 56, so we’re heading in the right direction.  Just three of those homes had transferable boat slips, proving how hard it is to find a slip in this segment. Perhaps best of all, I personally sold all three of those homes. Why did I sell those homes? Well, because I know how valuable a boat slip is. I know owning a home here is wonderful, but if all you really want is to hang out on a pier and boat, then you’re going to be miserable in your off-water slip-less home, even if it has some stone counters and a master bathroom.

The key to understanding this segment comes back to that bold question about proximity. That drives this particular market more than anything. You can buy a nice house in Country Club Estates for $500k. It won’t be remarkably close to the lake. Or you could buy a small cottage in Knollwood for $500k that might be 900′ from the water. Which do you value? Do you want to walk down to the pier in the morning to cast your line a few times, motivated by the hope that something might bight? Or would you rather sit on your screened porch, reading a book thinking about where fish fry will be on Friday night? Answer those questions, and you’ll have a clear direction for your pursuit.

2018 should be just like 2017. Inventory is terrible now, yes, but it won’t be that way forever. This market might be more sensitive to the new tax law, but if inventory builds there’s nothing stopping 2018 from falling in the 2016/2017 volume range. Prices are increasing, albeit modestly. Value still exists here, and I’ll be here to help you find it.

Shore Haven Sells

Shore Haven Sells

The single lane associations on the south shore of Geneva are some of my favorite lake access associations. These are not large associations like Cedar Point Park or Country Club Estates, rather they’re intimate skinny lanes with a handful of homes, perhaps 30, perhaps 50, rarely more and rarely less. These associations generally offer one thing that the larger associations cannot- transferable boat slips. Excepting Sybil Lane, the other three in this stretch- Shore Haven, The Lake Geneva Club, and Oak Shores, all offer each home a fully transferable slip. Some slips are larger and others small, some shallow and others deep, but if you’re a buyer on these streets then you’re going to be buying a boat slip, and that is always a good thing.

Some buyers don’t want boat slips. I’m not a boater, they say. I don’t even own a boat, why would I want a slip? Considering I’m a sage old Realtor at this point, I can tell pretty early on if the buyer is the sort who claims to not want a slip but who will, at a later date, wish for one. If a buyer wishes to spend $300k on a lake access home, that’s terrific news. But that buyer won’t be buying a boat slip for that sort of money. The home they can buy will be nice enough, with lake access through an association park and pier system, but a transferable slip will not be possible at that price range. However, if a buyer is looking at $500-600k lake access homes and doesn’t think they need a slip, I’ll always encourage that buyer to consider homes with a slip first. To vacation at Lake Geneva and not have access to a boat is like sitting down for a dinner at your favorite restaurant and not being allowed to order.

Last week, I closed on my listing in Shore Haven for $675k. This was a nice house with terrific proximity to the lake, but that’s not why it sold. It sold because of its wonderfully large and deep transferable boat slip. Today, the home next door to that one is closing to a customer working with me, and that home will be selling because it’s cute, sure, but mostly because of that slip.  Today, buyers searching for sub-$800k homes with boat slips are not going to be overwhelmed with the multitude of options available to them, but they are going to have options. As of this morning there are 6 homes with transferable slips (or pier) for sale priced under $800k, including my rare offering in Ara Glen listed at $775k.

The next home to sell on this list will likely be my painfully cute cottage in the Lake Geneva Club listed at $609k, pictured below. That home has a nice slip, a double lot, and all sorts of cottage charm. If you want to pull up to your lake house and feel a deep sense of contentment, then email me and let’s make a deal.  It’s May 1st, which means summer isn’t some far off thing we’re quietly dreaming about. It’s right here, right now, and before you know it you’ll be sitting in your Saturday suburban back yard wondering where all your cool neighbors went.  The time is short, but there’s still plenty of it. Buy this house, be in for Memorial Day Weekend, then wonder how you ever spent Memorial Day Weekend anywhere else.

$609k, with slip.

 

Linn Township Lake Access Market Review

Linn Township Lake Access Market Review

Once, I was in trouble with a seller. The seller was upset, but not upset like a seller gets when I leave a light on. Which, by the way, I tend to do. It’s like a puzzle, a prize, a riddle, each time different but always the same. A light, left on, somewhere.  But this seller was more angry than that, seriously angry, and not because I had left a light on or eaten a Reeses Peanut Butter Cup out of the pantry, which, of course, I never, ever, do. This time the seller was angry because I listed her home in the MLS under “Linn Township”. She said her home was in Lake Geneva, that no one looks for a home in Linn Township. That Lake Geneva is everything and Linn Township is nothing. Where is Linn Township? No one knows. She was upset.

This is not entirely uncommon, and if you’re a buyer I’m guessing you’ve possibly struggled with this distinction. The City of Lake Geneva is one municipality. The Town of Linn is another.  Where the confusion comes in is the mailing address for Linn Township homes is Lake Geneva, WI.  So, my confused seller from the example above was indeed correct, that her property had a Lake Geneva address, but it physically wasn’t in the City of Lake Geneva. Making matters worse, the Town of Geneva (think Lake Como, Geneva National, etc) also has a Lake Geneva mailing address but isn’t at all the City of Lake Geneva.  Of course none of this matters if Neumann was right and zip codes are meaningless.

Linn Township, whether confused for the City of Lake Geneva or not, is, without any doubt, the biggest player in our Lake Geneva lake access vacation home market. Linn has loads and loads of lake access communities, in fact, far more than all of the other lakefront municipalities combined.  I attempted a quick mental count and grew quickly tired by the time I had worked my way from Lake Geneva to Williams Bay, adding up 10 associations in that stretch alone. That brings up another item of geographical housekeeping: Linn Township is that area on the lake that extends on the North Shore between the City of Lake Geneva and the Village of Williams Bay. It’s also the area on the South Shore that runs from Fontana on the  West all the way back to the City of Lake Geneva on the East. It’s a large municipality, hosting a few dozen lake access associations, some big and others very, very small.

Today, just 16 off-water lake access homes are available in Linn Township. That’s a tragically low number, but it’s actually more inventory than most of the other municipalities have, relative to their 2016 sales. Last year, 12 lake access homes sold in Linn Township, priced from $69k for a cottage in Knollwood (please do not ask me to find you a $69k cottage in Knollwood, because the one that existed just sold), all the way up to an off-water estate in Loramoor that I sold for $1.625MM.

Maple Hills had a sale in the $200s, but before I tell you more, I will tell you that I’m not a huge fan of Maple Hills purely because it doesn’t feel like a lake access community. The location, approximately three million miles from the lake, makes it feel more like a subdivision in the woods than a subdivision near the lake, and for that reason, I’m not all that interested.  There was a sale in the Lake Geneva Beach Association at $360k, and there were sales in Wooddale (3), the Lake Geneva Highlands (2), Sunset Hills, Forest Rest, and Knollwood (2).  These are the sales, but 2016 was more notable for what didn’t sell, rather than for what did.

Per the MLS, there wasn’t a single closing in Shore Haven, Lake Geneva Club, Oak Shores, or Sybil Lane.  Nothing sold on Aspen Lane, nothing on Black Point, nothing in Glen Fern, nothing in Hollybush, nothing on Hunt Club Lane, nothing in Valley Park, nothing in the Lindens, nothing in Alta Vista, nothing here and nothing there. It was a year of limited inventory, and because of that, the sales totals were anemic. But beyond the lack of inventory pushing the overall number number, there were some notable offerings that didn’t transact. I discussed this at length in my year end review of the lake access market, but as a quick reminder, the market tested that $1.1-1.4MM price range for off-water, older homes that required significant updating and the market responded with a muffled, unenthusiastic, meh.

I don’t think the lake access inventory is going to stay limited for too long, but the lack of available inventory in each segment is causing a bit of gridlock for sellers that would-be move up buyers.  If you own a nice $600k cottage with a slip and you’re looking to upgrade to an entry level lakefront for $1.4MM, that’s really nice. But if you’re that seller who would be a buyer, you need something to buy. If you can’t find something to buy, then you’re not going to have something to sell, and if you’re not a seller then what am I doing here? This is the problem today, as each market needs a carrot waiting for it in the next market higher, and without that incentive to upgrade the market stalls. That’s what it feels like right now.

Linn Township is a wonderful municipality in which to own your lake house. The taxes are low, and without adjacent city-centers, the roads feel more rural, more quaint.  All of Linn Township functions on private well and septic (or holding tank), so that’s something to be aware of but it isn’t something to fear. I live in a home serviced by private well and septic and I’m almost entirely normal.  If you’re looking for a lake access home in Linn Township and your target association doesn’t have any open inventory today, please reach out to me and let me know what you’re looking for. I’ll go find it for you.

Lake Geneva Market Update

Lake Geneva Market Update

I was going to write this morning a response to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal. The article, Homeowners Hit The Jackpot, appeared to be, at the headline level, something that might interest me. Then I read the article and deemed it rife with stupidity. How could I respond to something as lame as that article? And so I decided instead to write a market update. Lake Geneva, it’s December. It’s almost time to start talking about the year in the past tense, but if we did that now we’d miss the present. It’s December, and there’s a lot happening. Here’s your Lake Geneva Market Update.

Yesterday, I closed on W4160 Lakeview in Linn Township.  I had that cute little lakefront for sale for what felt like most of my life, but was, in fact, just the last two summers. The house was what you’d expect of an entry level lakefront. 50 feet of frontage, no garage, basic finishes. It was a charming little place, with a boathouse that most estates would like to own. The house was simple, the sales price $1,260,000. The new buyers happy, sure, but not yet certain just how good it will be to own a weekend home on this lake. The seller had owned the house for 11 years and didn’t make any money on it. In that, I failed. But the owner told me yesterday that although the house isn’t the fanciest on the lake, and although the bedrooms are small and the kitchen boasting white appliances, his family looks at that property as the place where the best of their memories were made.  That, after all, is what this whole game is about.

This week I brought to market a lake access home in Shore Haven. It’s a nice house, this Shore Haven place. It has a slight, squinting view of the lake if the leaves are in the right position (on the ground). It also has a two car garage and plenty of parking, attributes which are rare in the lake access world. The house is charming, the finishes nice enough, the layout comfortable with the possibility of attic expansion if someone so desired. But that’s not really the thing that matters with this $749k new listing. What matters is the boat slip. Slips, in the eyes of the wandering market, are all created equal. You either have one or you don’t. If you have one you’re lucky. It you haven’t one you’re sad. You didn’t need one, you said. But above a certain price point off the lake you do need one, because everyone else expects one even if you don’t. That said, this boat slip is fantastic. It’s deep and it’s big and it’s easy to pull in and out of, no matter if a north wind is howling from Williams Bay. Boat slips matter, and this slip that accompanies this house is an absolute gem.

Last week I closed on a Bay Colony condo. I don’t sell a lot of condos anymore, but I sold a ground floor two bedroom in the north building for $415k. That price is significant, as that $415k price is the lowest paid for any unit in either Bay Colony building since at least 2005.  Does the kitchen have a Viking range? Don’t be ridiculous. It might after the remodel, but it doesn’t now, and that’s why I negotiated on behalf of a client and we pushed a $475k asking price to a $415k closing price. Want to buy a condo on the lake? We can go bargain hunting together.

For the remainder of the year we’ll see a few new contracts, but mostly we’ll see the closings of homes that have been placed under contract over recent weeks and months. Lest you think it’s a bad idea to buy a lake house in December, consider the importance and duration of a Lake Geneva summer. If you want to be ready for summer you have to prepare in the winter. It’s December, which means it’s basically winter, and now is the time to start your preparations for the upcoming summer. The summer, not coincidentally, which has the chance to either be the best summer of your life or just another one.

 

Above, the new Shore Haven listing for $749k.