Blog : Sales

Geneva Lakefront Market Update

Geneva Lakefront Market Update

The curious thing about Lake Geneva is that the market would potentially be fine even if another new customer never followed his roads to our roads and purchased a lakefront house.  No new buyers, no problem. Never, ever, a new buyer who needs figure out our scene in order to buy it. If no one ever came here again, we’d still have a market.

That’s obviously not entirely true, but at times it sure does seem like we needn’t another new buyer. We have enough, and they’re the people who are already here. One of my favorite transactions to assist in is the buyer who is new to Geneva Lake looking to capture something ideal. That buyer, someone with no prior experience here, hasn’t yet been confined to his developed tastes. He’s a blank slate, a clean canvas, and that buyer can look at this market without geographic bias. That’s a terrific sort of buyer, one that I highly value.

But that’s not the traditional buyer here. That buyer exists, of course, but that buyer isn’t what keeps this market humming. What keeps this market on the move is the lakefront ownership group. Those 600 or so discerning lakefront owners; that’s our market. One year they might wish for a big estate, with 800 hydrangeas and no fewer than 375 rose bushes. But three years later they may long  for the simplicity of a lakeside cottage, still with a slate roof, of course, but a cottage nonetheless. A pure lake experience, tidy and controlled. Who could tend to 800 hydrangeas?

Yesterday, a new sale on this Great Lake. The last time Clear Sky Lodge sold it was my listing as I represented Bank of America in the liquidation of that valuable asset that they came to own by way of court proceedings. That sale in 2012 was for $3,700,000.  Clear Sky sold again yesterday, this time without my involvement, which has put me in a sullen mood for such a lovely Friday.  The price? $5,715,000.

That’s a lot of money for this old log house, but I won’t say it wasn’t worth it. The house is rare and intensely magnificent. The location desirable, the views sublime, the logs super loggy. I like this sale for the market, but it’s a bit of a loss leader. The appreciation from 2012 of more than 50% isn’t reflective in the broad market. Some homes have appreciated this much, others have not. This is why it’s difficult to take individual sales and suppose that they are meaningful to the broader market segment.

If you’re sad that you missed out on this house, I have the next best thing available at Clear Sky Lodge, with tennis court, swimming pool, canopied slip, and beautiful privacy listed at $2.99MM…

The trend of lakefront owners swapping homes is nothing new. It’s a common theme here, but it appears to be on the rise. When the markets were bad I encouraged would-be-sellers to sell low and buyer lower. I argued it was, in fact, a better situation than it would be to sell high and buyer higher. Very few people listened, but those that did have found the new market to be rewarding.

The key for the lakefront market now remains inventory. We need more of it. Ready made inventory, easy houses with large lots. Others with small lots. We need all of it. If you’re a buyer on the hunt, let’s hunt together. If you’re a seller considering a move, you know who to call. (It’s me. Call me. Or Email, that’ll be easier. Text is fine, too.) 

Lake Geneva Market Update

Lake Geneva Market Update

It’s been a while since I’ve written a broad market update. It had also been a while since I felt the warmth of a bright sun on my skin. But yesterday fixed that latter absence, and today I’m sporting a proper spring sunburn. Sunburns are generally understood as being bad. Bad for your health, bad for sleeping. But an early spring burn, with just a slight sensation of sting, well, that’s something that everyone of our winter condition needs. It’s an event. A ceremony. A wonderful happening that signals the passing of winter with the emergence of spring. I don’t like sunburns, not one bit. Except in April.

The Lake Geneva vacation home market has endured quite a winter. Winter was fine, I suppose. It snowed a bit and it was cold a bit, but it didn’t snow a ton and it wasn’t cold all that often. That was winter. But March and April, the two months to which we generally assign some spring tendencies, they didn’t cooperate. The weather was awful. It was. Terrible, really. Rainy and windy or snowing and windy. Early ice out means nothing if the ice is replaced with snow. And so we endured. Showings were made and showings were canceled. Who could drive in this snow and that rain?  The market faced obstacles, mostly from the clouds above, and yet here we are. The market triumphed over so-called-spring, and is, today, poised to do some serious selling.

Because we’d be remiss to fail to recognize that the weather has indeed had an impact on our market. The market has performed valiantly, don’t be confused, but I can only imagine how much stronger the market might be today if not for the desperate grip of a belligerent winter. We’ve had sales, closings, showings, galore.  If I’m a buyer today, I’m worried. The market performed well in spite of the weather.  Can you guess how much better it might do if it were able to excel because of it?

Current vacation segment activity knows no limit. The entry level lake access market is active, with pending deals in Country Club Estates and Cedar Point Park. Country Club has had the hot hand of late, with buyers greedily gobbling up any bits of inventory, with few exceptions.  Further up the price scale, there are three off-water homes pending sale between $800k and $1.5MM. Those homes include one in Wooddale ($899k), one on Hunt Club Lane ($1.3MM), and the long-listed, renovated Loramoor home ($1.499MM). These homes are all fine in their own right, and each sale will ultimately make plenty of sense to me, and to the market.

There was a time back during the prior market cycle when the least expensive listing on Geneva Lake was right at $2MM.  If you liked that market, you’re in luck, because today there are just two true lakefront homes available priced under $2MM. The bulk of the lakefront inventory today is priced between $2-3MM, with several fine offerings in that mix. Some of those properties have been listed for quite some time, others are fresh to market this season.  My predictive qualities are quite refined, and as of now I’m going on a limb and guessing we’ll see two or three new accepted offers out of those nine lakefronts in that particular price range by Memorial Day Weekend.

There are two lakefront spec homes being built in Cedar Point Park. Both of those homes are listed at $3.85MM and both have been under contract since last summer. The first one is now finished, and just closed for full price. I’m not going to elaborate on these sales publicly (you should be working with me if you want to know what I think about them), but I’ll just state the obvious: this market craves new construction. It loves it. It needs it. It cannot live without it.  $3.85MM x 2 proves it.

The top end of the market has been quiet in terms of new inventory, and just two long-contracted deals remain to be closed. Those are of the Born Free property on the North Shore of Geneva ($5.75MM) and Clear Sky Lodge ($6.5MM) on the South Shore. Sometimes I randomly capitalize the shores to make them feel more important.  Both of those sales will be fine, though both feel somewhat pricey given their prior, recent sales prices. That’s $3.5MM for Born Free in 2011 and $3.7MM for Clear Sky in 2012 (I represented the seller in that sale).  Still, the market is hot and these two properties prove that appreciation over recent years has been, in some cases, quite impressive. The best remaining upper bracket offering is my Basswood listing.  Watch the video here   to remember what summer looks and feels like.

Inventory remains the biggest concern as we transition into the summer market.  This concern isn’t limited to the lakefront market, as there are lots of buyers in search of a reasonably priced ($500k-$1.3MM) off-water home with either a lake view or a boat slip. But the lakefront is the market that generates the headlines, and the lakefront could also use an injection of new inventory. What segment has buyers waiting? Um, all of them? There are active buyers right now in every price range, from $200k cottages in Country Club to $10MM lakefronts. If I’m a seller today I consider the market and wonder if I should sell (maybe). If I’m a buyer I consider the market and wonder if I should jump (probably). But if I’m me, I’m just concerned about hanging on to this new spring-time tan (unlikely).

Above, sunrise from my 274 Sylvan listing in Fontana’s Buena Vista.
Lake Geneva Prices

Lake Geneva Prices

There’s an interesting bit of information available this morning courtesy a recent lakefront sale. The sale was of an older house on a 90′ lakefront lot in the Birches. The property was fine. The MLS description made no mention of it, but I believe the house may have been a Zook.  Zook homes are a lot like Frank Lloyd Wright homes, in that the sellers care about the pedigree of the architect, but the market doesn’t.  This property was initially listed for $3.5MM back in 2008, and after a series of price reductions and listing pauses, the property mercifully sold this week for $2.3MM.  I didn’t have the listing or the buy side, which is pretty awful for me but worse for the buyer and seller.

The parcel of land was reasonably decent, though I don’t count Maple Lane to be among the best streets on the lake. It’s a fine street with fine homes, but it’s not necessarily a street that has a history of selling for elevated prices. Today isn’t about that parcel, it’s about the market context of this sale.  Brokers are clamoring over potential listings to such an extent that prices are being driven up less by market conditions and more by the breathlessness of agents who are new enough to the business that they have no way to be sure of valuations. It’s not their fault, they’re just chasing dollars.  To understand what this sale means to the market we must first look back at some very recent history.

In 2016 I sold three lakefront homes on Lackey Lane. Of those three, two were modest homes, one of which has since been torn down while the other was renovated. Those two properties that sold at land value printed at $1.9MM and change, for 100′ lots on a really desirable street. Geographically, Lackey and Maple are close, so we’ll consider them to be likely comparables for each other, even though I find Lackey to be far more appealing.  Those two sales printed at around $19,000 per front foot. This isn’t some long ago number, this is 24 months ago. Market conditions today have improved, but market conditions in 2016 were still quite good.

The recent sale on Maple printed at $25,555 per front foot. The overall land mass at Maple was larger than Lackey by two fold, but the market pays little attention to overall mass and focuses instead, perhaps at times incorrectly, on frontage.   The Maple sale closed 34% higher than the 2016 sales on Lackey. Does this mean the lakefront market has appreciated 34% in the past 24 months? Of course not.  Does it mean that some properties have appreciated that much in such a short period of time? Absolutely yes.

In 2016, those Lackey sales were not easy sales. Both properties endured some time on market. Both properties were overlooked, even by smart buyers who were working with me.  Today, the Maple property proves out what I knew then: 100′ vacant lots that are selling at land value are becoming increasingly rare. Just as we’ll someday run out of dumpy lakefront cottages that you might be able to buy for $1.2MM, we’re also running out of 100′ lakefront lots with older, modest homes on them.  This scarcity is driving up prices in both categories, though the entry level market remains rather stagnant compared to the 100′ market. Expect this trend to continue as buyers seek out properties that offer them some upward mobility should they one day decide to build new, or undertake a serious renovation.

Notable November Sales

Notable November Sales

The month of November came in like a lion, or so I remember, and then it went out like a lamb. A tender, delicious lamb. Those early quitters found themselves baking in southern Florida, or dodging scorpions in Arizona. Others went on vacations to tropical locales, to avoid the dull of November.  These people missed out. November wasn’t terrible. November wasn’t awful. November wasn’t even tolerable. November was incredible. A perfect blend of fall and winter, a bit of cold here and some cold there, followed by sunshine and sunsets that would make July blush. November was quite a month at the lake, and like every month, there were sales that we should review.

The most expensive closing last month wasn’t really so expensive. $1.7MM for the house in the Elgin Club. This was my listing, as you’ll recall, but a buyer from a prior listing came back and bought it, so even though it closed my children still need new shoes.  The sale when viewed through a price per front foot prism is high ($34,000), but that’s because smaller properties always look high when judged by this blended average. The sale at $1.7MM was a terrific value. The seller decided it was time to move on, and the buyer took a flyer. The Elgin Club is an ideal spot on the water, and if you’re a buyer under $2MM and can find your way into the Elgin Club, you’re doing very well for yourself.

Next up is a dated modern house on a hill overlooking, at least from the top floor, Fontana Bay. The house on North Lakeshore Drive closed for $1.575MM, and the rumor around town is that this home will be torn down. If that’s the case, I will refrain from comment. No matter how hard it is for me to keep quiet, I won’t say a word. No, in spite of having so many things to say, so many cutting, terrible things to say, I won’t say a word. Not a peep from me, about this sale for $1.575MM. No boatslip here, by the way. But that’s all I’m going to say. Nothing more.

A home in Academy Estates closed for $950k, this one possessing a slip, and a pool, and some deferred maintenance. The price is okay, not great, not the worst thing I’ve ever seen. The house was one of those homes that couldn’t aspire to more than this price, so in that, I’d say the market provided a price that the seller felt acceptable, and that, is that. Academy Estates is a nice association to the East of the South Shore Club. If you’re an off-water buyer, there are far worse places you could end up.

The most interesting sale of the month was in the Lake Geneva Highlands. Earlier this year, I sold a small lakefront house for $925k. That was, at the time, the lowest price lakefront sale of the year. The house next door to that one just sold for $850k. That’s a nice price, no matter how difficult the house. I say it often, and I’m not wrong: the lake is running out of sub-million dollar homes. That’s because when one of these homes sells (perhaps one lakefront every other year sells below $1MM), the new owner rarely stands pat. Instead, they undertake some form of renovation. Perhaps a huge renovation, maybe an addition, maybe they tear it down.  No matter the course, a $900k lakefront home is rarely the same home a year or two after that low print. When that home comes back to market improved, it now commands a $1.5MM asking price, which removes one more sub-million dollar home from our lakefront. That’s why these low priced lakefronts are almost always a good idea.

Rounding out the activity that matters, I sold two smaller properties last month. In October I listed a ranch with a boatslip and dynamite proximity to the water in Oak Shores. Last month I sold that home for $610k. The home needs a bit of cosmetic updating, but it was a nice house in a wonderful location, and it made complete market sense.  Last week I sold a large townhouse in Abbey Ridge, near the Abbey Harbor, for $555k. That was a beautiful condominium, offering loads of square footage and upgraded finishes. Abbey Ridge is a unique creation in our market, as it offers two, three, and four bedroom condominiums in a resort setting for a reasonable price.

I was pleased that both of these sellers chose to list with me this fall. In doing so, they made the smart decision to not wait until Spring to list. That’s the common refrain at this time of year. Wait ’till spring. That refrain sounds nice only because it sounds familiar.  Sell to your competition, not to the season. This isn’t Door County. This isn’t Harbor Country.  Lake Geneva doesn’t close just because the temperatures drop. We just put on some sweet boots and play in the snow.

Geneva Lakefront Sales

A long time ago, I decided to write a real estate blog. Along the way, there have been some really bad posts. There have been a scant handful of good ones. There have been irrelevant ones, poignant ones, others. There have been times when I wished for nothing than to stop this writing and there have been other times when I wished for more time, to work harder at this, to effort on a different level. The blog was always intended to be somehow different than a typical real estate blog. For instance, I’ve eschewed the use of multiple exclamation points. I’ve also never pretended that posting a picture of a pretty pier was something that an insightful blog would ever do. I’ve made some people happy, and I’ve hurt some tender feelings. Let’s talk about those.

20121005-fall_chris_craft.jpg

Every day, all day, stock market pundits talk about stocks. They talk about this company and that company, about this CEO and that CEO. They talk about the things that make a company great, and they talk fearlessly about the things that makes the company bad. They’ll tell you to sell, or to buy, and when enough of them tell the audience to do one of those things in unison, the subject stock may rise. Often, when enough of the talkers tell their audience that a company is heading in the wrong direction, the stock falls. Billions are made and lost on these whims, yet the pundits talk and tell us what they know, hoping that what they know is more than what we already knew. I’d like to be able to do this for real estate.

And I have, to some tempered extent. Increasingly, however, if I say a sale is bad, or a house is bad, or a house is bad and the land is good, I hear the complaints. I hear of angry sellers, or angry buyers, or angry agents and their lemmings. I hear about the tender, easily hurt feelings of people who may have sold a house that I didn’t like. I hear from others who bought a house that the market didn’t like. I’m growing weary of the constant struggle to make everyone happy, and so I think I might stop commenting on the state of the market, on the state of a sale, on the state of this business.

Just kidding.

There was a sale last week on the lake, and I liked it. It wasn’t my listing, nor was it my buyer. I’m shamed by my absence from this sale, and from too many others this year, but not every buyer makes the proper representation decision and I must respect their mistake. The sale last week was of a shingle sided house in Cedar Point that first came to market in 2013 for $3.5MM. It may have been for sale before that, but I can’t recall the price or the year. That price was never right, but when the home finally sold last week for $2.185MM, I liked the sale. 103′ for that price in that location? I’m a big fan, and I always will be.

That sale was the 19th MLS lakefront sale of 2015. There have been two other auction sales, both achieving prices greater that my opinion of their actual value. Three of those sales have been in excess of $5MM. The 21 sales represent a huge swell of activity for the lake, and there are at least six more lakefronts pending sale right now. I’m expecting we’ll print those six, as well as three or four more before the end of 2015, making this year a most epic volume year. Last year at this date we had closed 15 lakefront sales, with nothing priced over $4MM.

For value minded buyers, consider this. November and early December offer some world class bargain hunting. Aged inventory generally feels like selling, and cool dreary days of November, the sort where fall slowly loses the fight against winter, those are the days we can make friends with rare value. While the year has been outstanding and lakefront buyers are milling about in record numbers, there is still value to be had if only you’ll look at those things that you’ve already passed over. Let me help you by pointing out the winners.