Blog : Abbey Resort

Lake Geneva Condotel Update

Lake Geneva Condotel Update

At this point, we should have all learned a few things. If we were paying attention during the last market cycle, from slow rise to raging boom to crushing collapse, then we should have taken some things away from that decade long episode. In the same way, from that collapse to the nascent recovery to this now active and vibrant seller’s market, this should be teaching us something as well. I suppose in that there is a difference. Have we learned anything or have we just observed it all from afar?

What I’ve learned, mostly, is that housing markets do not rise and fall based on the math of it all. Sure, low interest rates and stable stock markets might kick off a resurgence of housing haste, but that isn’t what propels a market. What pushes a market from Tidy Recovery to Raging Bull is confidence. Confidence is what makes a family of 4 making $90k annually purchase a new vinyl box in a cornfield for $410k. This is the same thing that makes the same family drive to the car dealer and sign for a 0% loan on a $70k Tahoe. Interest rates and unemployment figures are sweet, but what pushes a market into hyperdrive is nothing more than individual consumer confidence.

Most of the things that happened during the last cycle are happening in this one as well. FHA loans are way up. Like sky-high, as a percentage of new loans. These are US Taxpayer backed mortgages that are given out with very little money down. When a market is appreciating, these mortgages are fine. But when the market stalls and reverses, these homeowners who were given those house keys with as little as 3.5% down will be the first ones to run for the hills. But if we continue our learning from the last cycle, then we shouldn’t panic sell our house unless circumstances (job loss, illness, etc), mandate it. If you bought a house in 2008, then 2012 was a difficult time to consider your negative equity. But if you’ve hung on into 2018 you’ve more than likely made a full and complete equity recovery. That, and you’ve had a place to live for the past decade.

But these are not market specific lessons. For those, let’s turn to the Lake Geneva condotel market. Condotel is a silly way of describing the sort of housing unit that is sold as a condominium, but operates like a hotel room. You buy the unit, you pay taxes and dues and extraordinary fees to the hotel, and they give you a percentage of the rental income generated. In theory, it’s a tidy idea. In practice, it can be either great, reasonably acceptable, or downright horrible.

The Lake Geneva market has a handful of these so-called condotels. Notably at the Grand Geneva (Timber Ridge),  The Cove, The Bella Vista, The Abbey Resort, and a few others.  Understanding the context that our broad market is hotter than a pistol, let’s consider the current market for these sorts of properties. I won’t delve into each development, but I’ll sample a few to give you an idea as to how I feel about them as an “investment”.  Crud, those quotes likely gave me away already.

Timber Ridge is at the Grand Geneva. It’s a waterpark. It’s nice enough. There used to be a rib joint inside the waterpark hotel, but I haven’t been there since my kids were last invited to a birthday party there. Today there are nine units available at Timber Ridge priced from $99k to $189k. None are pending sale.  Normally someone dissecting a condotel market would look at the net income and compare that with the purchase price. Not me. I don’t care if the units print 3% or 5% or 7% annual return on the most recent run of numbers. That’s because that’s not the issue with these sorts of units.

I care about the value of the real estate. Let’s look at the $99k unit. First sold by the developer in 2001 for $160,400. Nice. Then sold once or twice. Then sold in 2003 for $206k to the current owners. After 15 years, their investment has declined more than 50%. Another unit listed at $102k sold previously for $181k. Another unit listed at $189k previously sold for $305k. And the beat goes on.  Rather than view these units as an opportunity that the market has beaten up, I prefer to view them as a painful lesson of what happens when consumer sentiment shifts. Take away the free steak dinner and boat cruise; would anyone ever buy a timeshare again?

Let’s check on the Cove in downtown Lake Geneva, the place with that absurd blue roof. A little unit for sale for $109k. Prior sale? A 2008 print at $170k. Here’s another unit listed at $134,900. Initial sale by the developer in 1996: $135,400. 22 years, negative equity.  Let’s move to Fontana, and check on what is likely the best of this bunch, the Abbey Hotel. Here’s a unit listed at $150k. Prior sales price? 12 years ago for $254k.

It’s not that I enjoy beating up on a particular market segment, it’s just that I don’t know as though I’d be a buyer of something like this. Yes, they might turn a small profit on an annual basis. But what of the initial investment? What about that crushing loss?  These properties are relatively illiquid, intensely sensitive to overall market conditions, and reliant on a consumer that just might have learned their lesson.

If you’re a buyer searching for an economical condo that you can rent out to generate some income, I’d opt for the lower priced condominium units in non condotel properties. I’d look at lower priced listings in Geneva National, Abbey Springs, and the Abbey Villas. I’d consider those options 99 times before I’d consider anything else. If you’re in the market for this sort of thing, email me and I’ll set you up with my assistant Vicki who can help guide you through this particular market segment.

 

 

Affordable Lake Geneva Vacation Homes

Affordable Lake Geneva Vacation Homes

Some would say that title is impossible. After all, load into a tour boat and take a trip around these shores and there’s very little that looks particularly affordable. Even the homes that look affordable come with seven figure asking prices, albeit low seven figures. Lake Geneva has historically been home to significant wealth, and the trend in recent years has only accelerated that status.  Several years ago a $10,000,000 home on this lake was viewed as a fortunate albatross.  It was neat, and lavish, but it didn’t make any particular sense, even for the wealthy. Today, a $10,000,000 home would be met with immediate buyer interest, as the liquidity that traditionally dried up around $5,000,000 now meets little resistance up to and through double that amount. Yes, Lake Geneva is for the wealthy, everyone knows that.

But that’s not where the story ends. Because Lake Geneva isn’t just for hedge fund managers and successful entrepreneurs. It’s for anyone who desires something different. It’s for everyone who wakes up on a Saturday morning in the summer and wonders what they’re going to do that day. It’s for those who are stuck in traffic on a Friday night, but not in the northbound lanes. It’s for those with the means to change their weekends and change their motivations, even if that doesn’t allow for a lakefront home or a lavish off-water spread.

Yes, you could buy a cottage in one of our area towns for $80k and use that for your summer house. That’s perfectly acceptable, and encouraged. But let’s assume you’re not looking to buy squalor. Let’s assume you want something easy, something low effort, something large enough to contain your family and/or friends in some form of luxury. If you’re thinking I’m going to suggest a tiny home, please read this bit on the folly of the tiny home. No, I’m suggesting a condo. A simple, easy, two or three bedroom condo. Something affordable. Something in the scene. Something that allows a weekend to be entirely and completely different from the 9-5. If you’re looking at Lake Geneva, as you should be, these condos have names and well defined price brackets. If you can spend $180-250k, you’re in luck. Lake Geneva has sensible, stylish options for you, too.

I’ve written about this particular segment often, because it deserves inclusion in any vacation home discussion. The condominiums that I find appealing in this segment include Abbey Hill, Abbey Villas, and Willabay. There are others, for sure, but these are the three that fit into this lower price point while still offering some meaningful value. When times were bad, these small condo associations were chock full of inventory. Too much inventory, some slight foreclosure activity, and overall malaise. Today, these complexes have recovered completely, and they offer some of the easiest value in our broad market. Let’s take a look at each one to see what’s happening.

Abbey Hill is perhaps my favorite. The complex isn’t right in town, like the Villas, but I appreciate the privacy. There’s a basic swimming pool and some nice topography here, all less than a mile from downtown Fontana. Today three units are available, priced from $199k to $255k. One of those three units is pending sale.  The condo fees at Abbey Hill are around $350 monthly, and taxes run around $3k annually. Factor in a 70% mortgage and you’re looking at a delightful vacation home for the cost of one long weekend rental at the Abbey Resort. Best of all, the units are all a bit tired, so a basic surface renovation can make a dramatic impact.

The Abbey Villas are adjacent the Abbey Resort on the harbor. That harbor is being renovated this off-season, so look forward to a beautiful new harbor (if there is such a thing) by next summer. The villas have a series of swimming pools, and are undeniably in the heart of the action. The beach, restaurants, and parks are all just a short walk from these units. Inventory swelled during the crisis, but today there are just two units available in the MLS, priced from $230-272k.  Some units here can sell into the $400s, if they are harbor front.  Taxes are similar to Abbey Hill, though assessments are a bit higher. Pets are not permitted here, so if you hate dogs and cats, you’re in luck.

In Williams Bay, Willabay fits into this particular segment. If you like being close to the water (short walk), but dislike the bustle of Fontana on a summer weekend, then Willabay might be a better fit. There’s a pool here and some tennis courts, all close to the Williams Bay lakefront and beach. There are five available units priced between $179-235k, with one unit pending sale. Taxes are similar to the Fontana units, and assessments are, on average, a bit lower than Abbey Hill. These units come with one car attached garages, as do most of the Abbey Hill units (the Villas lack garages).

If you love the Lake Geneva scene, and you’d like to be part of it, I’d gladly sell you a $5,000,000 lakefront house. I’d be happy to, really. But if that’s not in the budget, and a $200k condo near-ish the lake sounds more appealing, just let me know. You have solid options here, and I’m happy to guide you to the best value.